Using Manual Therapy To Treat The Spines Of Student Athletes

Over the years I have treated many student athletes for about every injury and body part you could think of.  A lot of them have been post-surgical ACL reconstruction, ankle surgeries, shoulder surgeries along with the typical sprains and strains of every body part.  It is always fun because young adults tend to heal very well and they are motivated.  Post-surgical therapy takes time because you have to let the body go through its normal processes of healing with the inflammatory response, swelling, early stages of movement and eventual strengthening.  I always say you promote the healing process with therapy after surgery, you can’t force the healing process.  You let the body do its job and we as therapist promote and guide the healing along for the most efficient recovery possible. 

I have enjoyed post-surgical rehab but I find it quite simple at this time, and what I really enjoy is treating students that have not had surgery.  I especially enjoy treating students that have back and neck pain that won’t go away or basically an injury to the spine.  I often treat cases that have not responded to chiropractic care or have had physical therapy without much help and meds really haven’t done anything to help either.  Why do I like these difficult cases so much?  Honestly, I like them because they are not difficult cases at all, and as long as you make the right diagnosis, treat the problem correctly, the pain usually goes away very quickly.  Again, young adults heal very well and if you treat with the appropriate manual therapy, they respond quite quickly.  For example, I had a young lady not too long ago that injured herself in gymnastics doing a tumbling skill.  She had pain in her low back into her left hip.  She was walking with a limp and had a hard time standing upright.  This went on for a month or two without much help.  When she came to me all she needed was the appropriate manual therapy with corrections of a rotated sacrum along with abnormal rotations of her lumbar spine.  These dysfunctions were not allowing her to walk upright and were causing her glute muscles to shut down.  Because she is young she healed very fast after the appropriate treatment and a few exercises to engage the correct muscles.  I saw her two visits.  Another case was similar with a young student woke one morning with low back pain and hip pain that would not go away.  He was actually recommended to have surgery on his hip.  He came to me and also had rotations in his sacrum and lumbar spine along with some other dysfunctions present.  He was back to normal after 6 visits.  If he had not come to me who knows what the outcome would have been.  Again he was recommended for surgery and all it really took was the correct diagnosis and treatment to fix him.  Another example is a young man came to me after having pain in his shoulder and neck for years.  He had many kinds of treatment and nothing helped.  The problem was he had not had the appropriate manual therapy of his thoracic, cervical spine and shoulder.  All he had was therapy utilizing strengthening exercises and stretching and chiropractic care many times without much help.  Once I appropriately treated him with manual therapy his symptoms went away.

Next time your student athlete is having pain that won’t go away think about the type of treatment they have had.  If they have not had good manual therapy then that may be the next step to take. 

 

Physical therapy in Newark, Granville, and Pataskala, OH Areas

IMG_0166Are you looking for physical therapy or a physical therapist in Newark, Granville, or Pataskala, OH? If you answered yes to this, then you have come to the right place. Dr. Dan Wright is a Doctor of Physical Therapy and a physical therapist in the Newark, Granville, and Pataskala, OH area. He is a specialist in relieving pain and improving movement problems, and he can help you return to the activities you enjoy. Call us today to schedule an appointment 740-707-0354 or to answer any questions you may have. Thank you.

Neck Pain Gone Once And For All!

LEVATOR SCAPULA MANUAL STRETCH

LEVATOR SCAPULA MANUAL STRETCH

Neck pain can be devastating to deal with be it from whiplash, a fall, poor posture, or any other trauma. Rarely does neck pain only encompass the neck, but also the shoulder and upper back. It is not uncommon to have pain deep in the shoulder blade or on the inside top of the shoulder blade that is coming from the neck. Physical therapy is often one of the stops along the road of recovery. Traditional physical therapy is not always able to deal with the complexity of neck pain because just doing the exercises in physical therapy can’t take care of the whole problem. What is often needed is the skill of a manual therapist performing osteopathic manipulation and myofascial release. This is because the muscles and joints of the neck, upper back, and shoulder blades need to be released with manual therapy before exercises with help. The sequence of my manual therapy treatment starts at the lower thoracic spine working up to the upper thoracic spine. Then working on the levator scapula muscles and scalenes of the neck with myofascial release techniques. Finally the cervical spine gets treated out with manipulation. The ribs may also need to be treated. This does not have to be the treatment sequence but this is the pattern I follow. After the manual therapy, a few simple exercises should be given for neck flexibility and to improve posture. Treatments involving manual therapy, and then followed up by simple exercises is a much more effective way to get rid of pain. If you want your pain resolved NOW, then give me a call or book an appointment at wrightphysiotherapy.com. Thank you!

Treating high school athletes for improved performance and post game healing

high school football

Stacy Sykora, the designated libero for the U.S. Women?s National Volleyball Team, two-hands a return during an exhibition match against top-ranked Brazil at Clune Arena on the campus of the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo., June 14, 2008.  Team USA is concluding a three-match 2008 U.S. Olympic Team Exhibition for Volleyball series that started June 11. (U.S. Air Force photo by Rachel Boettcher/Released)

High school athletics are very demanding and can take a toll on the body. A season of wear and tear and injuries leads to underperforming and a less successful season. No athlete wants to underperform especially when the raw talent is present. Performing at the highest level is every athlete’s goal. Most athletes perform conditioning and weight lifting to prepare for and stay strong during the season, but they are missing ONE BIG COMPONANT when it comes to staying healthy. Trainers and conditioning coaches are good at pure strength and endurance exercises but they do not have the education and the ability to evaluate, make assessments, and treat dysfunctions/injuries an athlete may have before and during the season that is limiting the athletes ability to play at the highest level. There is no reason to miss out on the ONE BIG COMPONANT that can lead to a much more successful and healthy season. And what is the ONE BIG COMPONANT? It is having a total body movement evaluation from Wright Physiotherapy to look for problems the athlete may have in muscles and joints that is limiting the highest level of performance. Then the appropriate hands on manual therapy will be performed to correct any dysfunctions that are present. At the end of the session a group of exercises will be given to specifically strengthen the body and deficits that were found. During the season, manual therapy and hands on treatment techniques can be used to heal injuries such as sprains, strains, back pain, knee injury, shoulder injury, hip injury, and injuries of all kinds to keep the player on the field or court throughout the season. Wright Physiotherapy can keep you healthy, so you can be an all-star performer. Give me a call for a healthier and more productive season!

Physical therapists and personal trainers working together

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Physical therapists are the experts in the field of movement and musculoskeletal injuries. We evaluate, diagnose, make assessments, and treat to get people back to their original level of functioning, but we are not the only skilled profession that is very in tune with how people move and function. Personal trainers are also highly skilled professionals that spend significant time with their clients watching how they move and perform physical activity. They are highly knowledgeable on muscles, how they work, and the kinds of activities to get the muscles strengthened back in shape. Physical therapists and personal trainers should have a symbiotic relationship and not work against each other. It is not a competition. We both want to keep people healthy. I have become a better physical therapist working with personal trainers and athletic trainers over the years. I know my limitations as a physical therapist when it comes to treating patients and getting them back to being as functional as possible. I am very good at making diagnoses when a patient comes to me with an orthopedic injury and I can get them back to a high level of function, but sometimes my skill level will only take the patient so far. For example a patient comes to me with, let’s say, a shoulder or low back injury. I will treat using manual therapy and appropriate exercises to reduce pain and hopefully completely rid the patient of pain, but sometimes I am not able to take the patient to the next level of healing due to the equipment I have at hand. In those situations I rely on personal trainers to use their knowledge and skill to complete the healing process using either more intensive exercises or cross fit training in a gym. Also, physical therapists and personal trainers can be good referral sources for each other. A personal trainer that has been injured can come to me and I can treat them, so they can return to the gym as quick as possible allowing them to work and make money. An injured personal trainer cannot make a living. When this happens trust is built between the personal trainer and myself. The personal trainer learns the healing powers of osteopathic manipulation, and I learn the skill of the personal trainers so I can refer my patients to them for quality training and they can also refer to me with injured clients.  A win win situation for both!

Osteopathic correction of lumbar and sacrum

Left on right sacral torsion correction

LEFT ON RIGHT SACRAL TORSION CORRECTION 7/17/16

This is an osteopathic manipulation technique for a sacral dysfunction.  More specifically a sacrum that is rotated left on the right oblique axis.  This dysfunction can cause intense pain in the low back and/or down the legs.  This is one of the problems people often have if they have had therapy or chiropractic care in the past without much help.  Unless the dysfunction is corrected, the pelvis and lumbar spine will never move appropriately and pain may never go away.  Manual therapy is very helpful in correcting these dysfunctions.

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Preparing for Right FRS at L5 correction

RIGHT FLEXED, ROTATED, SIDE BENT L5 (R FRS L5)

When a sacral torsion is present, their is also ALWAYS a dysfunction at the L5 vertebrae.  This is due to how the sacrum and lumbar spine interact with each other.  The picture shows the set up for the right FRS L5.  This has to be corrected out before the torsion is corrected.  Again, an easy diagnosis and treatment for someone trained in osteopathic treatment techniques specializing in manual therapy.

 

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Right ERS dysfunction set up for treatment

RIGHT EXTENDED, ROTATED, SIDE BENT L3 (R ERS L3)

This is another dysfunction that can occur at the lumbar spine.  Instead of the spine having an FRS dysfunction, it can also have an ERS dysfunction.  These dysfunctions are also easily corrected by manual therapy and can also occur in the presence of a sacral torsion and an FRS in the lumbar spine.  When the ERS is at L5 vertebra, their is often a posterior unilateral sacral nutation also present.

 

Physical therapy using manual therapy for treatment of pain.

Hands on manual therapy using osteopathic manipulation techniques is the most effective way to treat orthopedic pain!  The philosophy of osteopathy is to treat the body using manipulation to get the body to function as efficiently as possible, and then work on appropriate strengthening exercises to prevent the pain from returning.  For example, with low back pain the movement of the individual vertebra in the low back need to be improved for normal function and then appropriate core strengthening and stretching needs to be done to allow the body to heal efficiently.